At Oracle, Closed May be the New Open. Whither MySQL?

I hope I can be forgiven the cute headline. It speaks to a series of events that were heard in Oracle Open World messaging, where the word “open” appeared much less frequently than in years past. Oracle is fortifying its borders, opening new fronts in its market battles, and slowly closing itself off from some former partners and community relationships. It’s Fortress Oracle time. Its overall posture has hardened, and the implications for any but the largest MySQL customers are worrisome.

Many actions support this interpretation. The “fork you” message to Red Hat at OOW was an obvious indicator, tightening the OS play that accompanies the hardware ownership now rounding out Oracle’s full-stack story. Now, a few weeks later, Oracle’s move to drop low-end MySQL support, abandoning/conceding low-end customers to others, seems indicative both of Oracle’s willingness to move away from “open,” and to minimize investment in low-end customers. Mark Hurd is the new owner of support, and his reputation for cost-cutting should not be ignored in considering this; moreover, Windows is the majority platform for MySQL, and Oracle doesn’t want to invest there either. Read more of this post

EMC Buys Greenplum – Big Data Realignment Continues

EMC’s acquisition of Greenplum, announced today as a cash transaction, reaffirms the obvious: the Big Data tsunami upends conventional wisdom. It has already reshaped the market, spawning the most ferment in the RDBMS (and non-R DBMS via the noSQL players) space in years. When I first posted on Greenplum over a year ago, I said that

Open source + capital has created an intriguing new model of rapid innovation in “mature” markets, and the database space – like BI – is not a done deal. It is indeed possible to escape the gravity well, if you execute. Greenplum is getting it done, and is among the new stars to watch.”

Why the open source reference? Greenplum uses a parallelization layer atop PostgreSQL (like Aster, another of the new breed of ADBMS.)

Now EMC has written the next chapter in that story. In the process, it adds a new piece (after literally dozens of others in the past few years) to its own portfolio, which already includes unstructured data (via Documentum) and virtualization (via VMWare), layered in among the industry-leading storage and information management pieces. Disruptive? You bet. Is EMC finished? I doubt it. Candidates? BI tools, ETL, MDM, data integration come to mind. Losers? At least one big one. Read on. Read more of this post