At Oracle, Closed May be the New Open. Whither MySQL?

I hope I can be forgiven the cute headline. It speaks to a series of events that were heard in Oracle Open World messaging, where the word “open” appeared much less frequently than in years past. Oracle is fortifying its borders, opening new fronts in its market battles, and slowly closing itself off from some former partners and community relationships. It’s Fortress Oracle time. Its overall posture has hardened, and the implications for any but the largest MySQL customers are worrisome.

Many actions support this interpretation. The “fork you” message to Red Hat at OOW was an obvious indicator, tightening the OS play that accompanies the hardware ownership now rounding out Oracle’s full-stack story. Now, a few weeks later, Oracle’s move to drop low-end MySQL support, abandoning/conceding low-end customers to others, seems indicative both of Oracle’s willingness to move away from “open,” and to minimize investment in low-end customers. Mark Hurd is the new owner of support, and his reputation for cost-cutting should not be ignored in considering this; moreover, Windows is the majority platform for MySQL, and Oracle doesn’t want to invest there either. Read more of this post

GoldenGate Software Buy a Win for Oracle

Oracle today announced it is buying GoldenGate Software for an undisclosed sum, likely a couple of hundred million dollars. To revisit some facts from an earlier post, Goldengate had been in business 15 years, with some 500 customers, 4000 solutions deployed, and strong partnerships with Oracle, Teradata and Ingres on the database side, and Microstrategy and Amdocs in the app and BI space. Their message revolved around 3 key attributes of their changed-data-based replication technology: heterogeneity, real-time (log-based) performance, and high-volume transactional support. Read more of this post

Can GoldenGate Software Continue to Grow Transactional Replication?

GoldenGate Software may not be a well-known name, except in circles where transactional replication is a hot topic, but after 15 years in business, they have assembled a sizable base of some 500 customers, with 4000 solutions deployed, and partnerships with vendors as diverse as Teradata and Ingres on the database side, and Microstrategy and Amdocs in the app and BI space. Their message revolves around 3 key attributes of their changed-data-based replication technology: heterogeneity, real-time (log-based) performance, and high-volume transactional support (committed only.) And despite their notoriously closed-mouthed approach to their finances, it’s fair to say that they are generating tens of millions of dollars in revenue yearly (Hoover’s says $9.7M in 2007, but I believe that’s very low), so it’s evident the marketplace is interested. The big question is whether GoldenGate will invest to sustain and grow sales, or watch larger competitors competitors take their market away, now that they’re on the radar. Read more of this post