Symposium Notes – Day Four Returns to Data Security, and to Hadoop

Thursday, the final day, reinforced a theme for the week: data security is heating up, and organizations are not ready. It came up in half of today’s final 10 meetings.

“Is my data more secure, or less, in the cloud?”

“Does using open source software for data management compromise how well I can protect it?”

“I’m a public utility – can I put meter data in the cloud safely? What about if it is used to drive actions at the edge?”

“I’m using drones for mapping and the data is in the cloud – am I exposed?”

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Symposium Notes – Day Three Features Data Assembly

With 24 meetings under my belt from the first two days at Orlando Symposium, Wednesday’s 13 (and a presentation) didn’t look quite as daunting. It began well, with enough time for a muffin and some tea at 730 AM in the analyst workroom near to the cubicle I’d spend the day in. Then I launched right in to a couple of predictive analytics discussions.

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Symposium Notes – Day One Features Hadoop

Gartner Symposium is always exciting, challenging and stimulating for analysts; we get to interact with many organizations in a brief time during 1on1 meetings scheduled based on our coverage. It offers an fascinating snapshot of what is on people’s minds – enough so that they have traveled to a conference in part to have that discussion.

Today, October 17, 2016, was the first full day of the 2016 Orlando Symposium and over half of my meetings were about Hadoop.

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Hadoop Is A Recursive Acronym

Hopefully, that title got your attention. A recursive acronym – the term first appeared in the book Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid and is likely more familiar to tech folks who know Gnu – is self-referential (as in “Gnu’s not Unix.”) So how did I conclude Hadoop, whose name origin we know, fits the definition? Easy – like everyone else, I’m redefining Hadoop to suit my own purposes. 

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Data Security for Hadoop – Add-on Choices Proliferating

In my post about the BYOH market last October, I noted that increasing numbers of existing players are connecting their offerings to Apache Hadoop, even as upstarts enter their markets with a singular focus. And last month, I pointed out that Nick Heudecker and I detected a surprising lack of concern about security in a recent Hadoop webinar. Clearly, these two topics have an important intersection – both Hadoop specialists (including distribution vendors) and existing security vendors will need to expand their efforts to drive awareness if they are to capture an opportunity that is clearly going begging today. Security for big data will be a key issue in 2014 and beyond.

 

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AAA is Not Enough Security in the Big Data Era

Talk to security folks, especially network ones, and AAA will likely come up. It stands for authentication, authorization and accounting (sometimes audit). There are even protocols such as Radius (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service, much evolved from its first uses) and Diameter, its significantly expanded (and punnily named) newer cousin, implemented in commercial and open source versions, included in hardware for networks and storage. AAA is and will remain a key foundation of security in the big data era, but as a longtime information management person, I believe it’s time to acknowledge that it’s not enough, and we need a new A – anonymization.

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