Strata Spark Tsunami – Hadoop World, Part One

New York’s Javits Center is a cavernous triumph of form over function. Giant empty spaces were everywhere at this year’s empty-though-sold-out Strata/Hadoop World, but the strangely-numbered, hard to find, typically inadequately-sized rooms were packed. Some redesign will be needed next year, because the event was huge in impact and demand will only grow. A few of those big tent pavilions you see at Oracle Open World or Dreamforce would drop into the giant halls without a trace – I’d expect to see some next year to make some usable space available.

So much happened, I’ll post a couple of pieces here. Last year’s news was all about promises: Hadoop 2.0 brought the promise of YARN enabling new kinds of processing, and there was promise in the multiple emerging SQL-on-HDFS plays. The Hadoop community was clearly ready to crown a new hype king for 2014.

This year, all that noise had jumped the Spark.

– This post is continued on my Gartner blog –

Hadoop Is A Recursive Acronym

Hopefully, that title got your attention. A recursive acronym – the term first appeared in the book Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid and is likely more familiar to tech folks who know Gnu – is self-referential (as in “Gnu’s not Unix.”) So how did I conclude Hadoop, whose name origin we know, fits the definition? Easy – like everyone else, I’m redefining Hadoop to suit my own purposes. 

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Satya Nadella on Mobility: It’s Personal

At Garner Symposium, Drue Reeves and I had the opportunity to interview Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Here’s a brief clip from the closing. I’m summarizing and Satya, passionate as he was throughout the conversation, lays out his vision about mobility that crosses the personal and professional: mobility of the individual and the app experiences. “Have my work and life wherever – that’s the true form of mobility.”

 

Microsoft’s Portfolio – A Formidable Mix

For the past few months, I’ve been Gartner’s Vendor Lead for Microsoft. For some 30 vendors, we assign a single analyst to act as a focal point for coordinating across the 1000 analysts we have when research covers that vendor.

In Microsoft’s case, that has proven to be fascinating – we have some 3 dozen Magic Quadrants alone that have been published about their offerings in the last 15 months or so. As Vendor Lead, I’m a mandatory peer reviewer for those and other documents. For my own edification, I decide to map the Magic Quadrants that feature Microsoft onto a quadrant that shows where Microsoft appears in that piece of research. The results are intriguing.

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Hadoop Investments Continue: Teradata, HP Jockey For Position

Interest from the leading players continues to drive investment in the Hadoop marketplace. This week Teradata made two acquisitions – Revelytix and Hadapt – that enrich its already sophisticated big data portfolio, while HP made a $50M investment in, and joined the board of, Hortonworks. These moves continue the ongoing effort by leading players. 4 of the top 5 DBMS players (Oracle, Microsoft, IBM, SAP and Teradata) and 3 of the top 7 IT companies (Samsung, Apple, Foxconn, HP, IBM, Hitachi, Microsoft) have now made direct moves into the Hadoop space. Oracle’s recent Big Data Appliance and Big Data SQL, and Microsoft’s HDInsight represent substantial moves to target Hadoop opportunities, and these Teradata and HP moves mean they don’t want to be left behind.

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Microsoft Turns the ‘Scope on SaaS

One of the more interesting conversations I had at the Microsoft Worldwide Partners Conference this week concerned an initiative they have launched to help IT understand – and get under control – proliferating ungoverned SaaS applications. Brad Anderson, Corporate VP for Cloud and Mobility, told the 16,000 attendees that enterprises need help.  “We ask them how many SaaS apps they have in their environment and they usually tell us 30-40. We audit with the Cloud App Discovery tool and find , on average, over 300.” And are these managed? One can only imagine…

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Hadoop is in the Mind of the Beholder

This post was jointly authored by Merv Adrian (@merv) and Nick Heudecker (@nheudecker) and appears on both of our Gartner blogs.

In the early days of Hadoop (versions up through 1.x), the project consisted of two primary components: HDFS and MapReduce. One thing to store the data in an append-only file model, distributed across an arbitrarily large number of inexpensive nodes with disk and processing power; another to process it, in batch, with a relatively small number of available function calls. And some other stuff called Commons to handle bits of the plumbing. But early adopters demanded more functionality, so the Hadoop footprint grew. The result was an identity crisis that grows progressively more challenging for decisionmakers with almost every new announcement.

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Data Security for Hadoop – Add-on Choices Proliferating

In my post about the BYOH market last October, I noted that increasing numbers of existing players are connecting their offerings to Apache Hadoop, even as upstarts enter their markets with a singular focus. And last month, I pointed out that Nick Heudecker and I detected a surprising lack of concern about security in a recent Hadoop webinar. Clearly, these two topics have an important intersection – both Hadoop specialists (including distribution vendors) and existing security vendors will need to expand their efforts to drive awareness if they are to capture an opportunity that is clearly going begging today. Security for big data will be a key issue in 2014 and beyond.

 

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Microsoft’s New CEO – What’s Next for Microsoft?

In the most profound change of leadership in Microsoft’s history, Satya Nadella, who was head of the Cloud and Enterprise division,  has taken the helm, succeeding Steve Ballmer. Nadella’s “insider” understanding of Microsoft’s culture and his effectiveness in cross-team communication and collaboration could help him reshape Microsoft for the digital era — which will be key for the company to attain the visionary technical leadership to which it aspires.

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AAA is Not Enough Security in the Big Data Era

Talk to security folks, especially network ones, and AAA will likely come up. It stands for authentication, authorization and accounting (sometimes audit). There are even protocols such as Radius (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service, much evolved from its first uses) and Diameter, its significantly expanded (and punnily named) newer cousin, implemented in commercial and open source versions, included in hardware for networks and storage. AAA is and will remain a key foundation of security in the big data era, but as a longtime information management person, I believe it’s time to acknowledge that it’s not enough, and we need a new A – anonymization.

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